Attention Deficit Disorder Association

April 22, 2014

In This Issue

 A Message from the Editor

 ADDA Articles

- Don’t Run From Volunteering
- Succeeding With a Lack of Structure: Tips for Working On Your Own (Part 2)
- Twice Exceptional or Double Trouble? A Journey of Self Discovery

 Connect With ADDA

   A Message from the Editor

I don’t know about Uncle Sam, but WE want you!  This is an exciting time at ADDA.  Momentum is building as time rolls toward the 25th Anniversary ADDA Conference.  We’re rolling downhill and picking up speed!  There’s a lot to do, but with a group of committed, enthusiastic people working together, there’s nothing we can’t accomplish.

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead

At ADDA, we’ve set out to change the world for adults with ADHD.  We’ve been working hard to make a difference for 25 years, and we’re making significant progress.  This summer, we’ll have a wonderful opportunity to speak to many of the people who remember what life was like for adults with ADHD in the early days of ADDA, and we’ll celebrate just how far we’ve come.  And we’ll be making plans for the next 25 years!  This is an exciting time to be part of ADDA.  Look here to see what others think of ADDA Conferences.  We hope you’ll join us!

Celebrate ADDA’s 25th Birthday

ADDA’s 15th International Adult AD/HD Conference is getting closer and closer!  Because it’s ADDA’s 25th Anniversary, we’ve planned a bigger and better Conference than ADDA’s ever had!  In fact, this Conference for Adults with ADHD is the biggest and best of its kind that has EVER been held! ANYWHERE!  Registration is open and people are signing up fast!

You may have heard the “Heartbleed bug” is a serious security flaw in the OpenSSL software library, compromising thousands of passwords.  This software library is used by many sites like Google, Yahoo, and Amazon.com, which were found to be vulnerable.  However, Cvent, ADDA’s partner in processing Conference registrations, has checked its servers and found them to be not vulnerable to the Heartbleed bug.  They have not been compromised and remain secure.

Want to hear something awesome?  You can make payments!  That’s right… if you don’t have all the money right now, you can register today and take until June 30 to pay!  Join us in…

Celebrating the Progress of the Past and the Promise of the Future

 

More Great Webinars!

We’re back with more great Webinars!

May 7, 2014: 9PM Eastern
Get To It! Procrastination and ADHD with Dr. Kim Kensington
Learn more »

May 21, 2014: 9PM Eastern
The Couple's Guide to Thriving with ADHD with Melissa Orlov
Learn more »

 

For All You ACO Coaches!

ADDA and the ADHD Coaches Organization are working to create closer ties between our two organizations.  In fact, this week we’ll be announcing a new initiative we know ACO members will find exciting!  Keep your eyes open!

You don’t become a great coach by accident.  Hone your ADHD coaching skills, learn more about the benefits of coaching or discover the possibilities in becoming a coach.  Attend the ADHD Coaches Conference May 2 to 4, 2014 in Phoenix, AZ!  Enjoy over 30 breakout sessions, great networking opportunities and great people.  Visit www.ADHDCoaches.org to register!

Until next month, here's...

To your success,

Duane Gordon
ADDA eNews Editor

 

Enjoy These Articles Especially for Adults with ADHD Exclusively from ADDA

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  ADDA Articles

Use This One Weird Trick to… Put a Smile On Your Face!

 

Today, an instant cure is the only thing that captures our attention.  So today, let me share “one weird trick” to help you be more assured, outgoing and happy.  It may sound counterintuitive, but if you want to increase your confidence, improve your productivity and boost your social life, volunteering works every time.

Don’t Run From Volunteering

I can hear you already.  “Volunteer for ADDA?  Are you kidding?!  I can’t deliver everything I’m committed to now!”  When you feel overwhelmed yourself, you may find it difficult to believe taking on even more could be a good thing.  And it’s true adults with ADHD can pile too much on our plates…

  • We find it hard to say “No” even when we should.
  • We feel we “owe” people because we make their lives harder.
  • We’re impulsive, and we’re enthusiastic about any new project.

The problem is that our knee-jerk reaction to feeling overwhelmed is to hide.  We stop saying yes… to anything.  But the benefits of volunteering are enormous… you benefit, your family benefits and your community benefits.

And if you have a habit of saying “No,” you’re missing out!  Read More»

 


Succeeding With a Lack of Structure: Tips for Working On Your Own (Part 2)
By Alan Brown

 

In the last issue of the ADDA eNews, I described a benefit of working in a corporate or group environment; the inherent structure provides an external structure that we ADHDers lack “internally” – and contrasted it with the perils of working independently – at home or otherwise on our own.

Without the “safety net” of an external workplace structure (e.g., a boss keeping us accountable or a team member providing the occasional timely nudge), a key in our success is to build our OWN structures to compensate for those we lack inwardly.

Let’s take a look at a series of specific structural deficiencies along with some ways you can build your own structures.  Read more»

 


Twice Exceptional or Double Trouble? A Journey of Self Discovery
By Douglas Harris

 

My life as an adult diagnosed with ADHD can be broken into three phases: not knowing, knowing with my head, and knowing with my heart. Before diagnosis, I knew something wasn’t right but I didn’t know what it was. For many, this period lasts most of their lives. For years, the only explanations for shortcomings are character flaws, laziness or wilful troublemaking. A great relief accompanied my diagnosis. The second phase was largely cerebral; I learned all I could about ADHD and how it affected me. ADHD was an external challenge to be studied, examined and faced, but by the same person inside that I had always been. Read more»

 

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